Changes in HIPAA Compliance

The HiTech Act set in motion a series of changes to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) compliance for covered entities and business associates in 2009, which were followed by interim regulations issued by the department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”).  HHS has issued a final regulation that goes into effect on March 26, 2013, and requires compliance within 180 days by all covered entities and business associates.

The HiTech Act made a number of important changes to the law governing the security and disclosure of protected health information.  First, prior to HiTech, business associates of covered entities were not required to comply with the security rules and standards set forth in the HIPAA security regulations.  HiTech changed the applicability of the security regulations to include business associates.  The final regulation from HHS implements this provision of the HiTech Act.

Second, prior to HiTech, there was no federal requirement that a covered entity or business associate report a security breach that resulted in the disclosure of protected health information (“PHI”).  HHS subsequently issued interim regulations to implement these notification requirements, and as of March 26, 2013, HHS issued final regulations that alter the assumptions and exceptions to what constitutes a “breach” under HIPAA.

Business Associates are Covered Entities when it comes to PHI

HiTech initially changed the law governing PHI by requiring that business associates comply with the same security regulations that govern covered entities.  The final regulations with HHS clarify which security rules also apply to business associates under section 164.104 and 164.106, including those applicable rules found in Parts 160 and 162.  However, HHS also expanded the definition of “business associate” to include subcontractors of business associates that handle PHI on behalf of the business associate for the covered entity.  The regulation does provide certain narrow exceptions to who is now covered in the definition of a “business associate,” including an exception for “conduits” of PHI that may, on a transitory basis, transmit PHI but would not access the PHI except on a random or infrequent basis.  But the regulation appears to generally expand further the legal responsibilities, and potential liability, for members of the industry that work even indirectly for covered entities.

For existing health care providers, now might be the time to revisit your business associate agreement with your business associates, such as your EHR vendors.  Section 164.314 establishes certain requirements for these agreements, including provisions that all business associates comply with the full security rule, that subcontractors to business associates also comply with the full security rule, and that business associates provide the covered entity with security incident reporting in the event of a breach at the business associate’s or subcontractor’s facility or systems.

Changes in Security Breach and Notification

HiTech also introduced a breach notification provision which was intended to require covered entities to report to HHS, and where appropriate, to patients affected by a security breach involving their PHI.  The final regulations have modified the definition of a “breach” by establishing the assumption that an unauthorized access of PHI is a breach unless it can be demonstrated by the covered entity or business associate that there is a low probability that the PHI has been compromised.

Such a demonstration requires that the covered entity or business associate conduct a risk assessment and evaluate at a minimum the four factors described in the regulation: “(i) the nature and extent of the protected health information involved, including the types of identifiers and the likelihood of re-identification, (ii) the unauthorized person who used the protected health information or to whom the disclosure was made, (iii) whether the protected health information was actually acquired or viewed, and (iv) the extent to which the risk to the protected health information has been mitigated.”

Altering the burden and requiring a covered entity or business associate to engage in this risk assessment is likely to increase the number of breach notifications required under the final regulation.

The final regulation includes a variety of other changes in requirements for covered entities and business associates not discussed in this article, such as sale and marketing of PHI, use of genetic information for insurance underwriting, notices to patients of privacy practices, and disclosure of PHI to friends and families of decedents.  Providers should promptly examine their privacy and security policies to ensure compliance with the final regulations.

Published by

faithatlaw

Maryland technology attorney and college professor.

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